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. >> in europe, google faces anti-competition measures. >>> in the united states, ben bernanke gets ready to outline an exit strategy to a skeptical congress. >> a warm welcome to "worldwide exchange." i'm chloe cho in asia. it's just past 5:00 p.m. in singapore. let's check on where the asian markets are wrapping up the trading day. mostly weaker today on the back of weaker consumer confidence numbers. and toyota lows taking the nikkei lower by 1.5%. the hang seng off 0.75%. on the other hand, we have the shanghai composite erasing all of its earlier losses, pushing higher by 1.3%. a lot of speculation in small cap stops and what may be linked to the national people's congress set to kick off next friday. other markets are weaker, the kospi down 1%. the bombay sensex has been trading around the front line. the aussie market asterisk comes off the table, a lot of commodities and resources lower. the s&p/asx 200 down .5%. let's check on the ftse cnbc global 300. slightly off 0.4% at 4,315. good morning, becky. >> good morning. it's about 10:00 on the continent. european markets have been t
. >> in the united states, the spotlight shines today, ben bernanke is back on the hill and president obama's high profile health care summit. >> hello there. a warm welcome to "worldwide exchange." it's chloe cho in asia where it's just past 5:00 p.m. in singapore. a similar scene that we saw as yesterday, of course, investors picking up on bernanke's comments. going forward, could be weak. of course, we had some weak housing numbers, as well, along with disappointing consumer confidence this week. take a look at the damage report. the yen is not helping. nor are the toyota woes. the hang seng, slightly off the shanghai composite. we did have the auction yield on three-month bills along with one-year bills earlier this week that left those yields unchanged. a lot of investors seem to be thinking that perhaps this could be a sign the pboc is taking it easy as far as tightening is concerned. as for the other markets, the kospi down 1.6%. the bombay sensex is pretty much right along the flat line and the aussie market lower by 1.2%, back below that key 4,600 level and take a look at the ftse cnbc gl
, will they or won't they? the bailout chatter for greece intensifies. >> and here in the united states, ben bernanke will set out the fed's exit plan today but will likely make jobs clear, we'll still be in the car for some time to come. >> and welcome to "worldwide exchange." i'm christine tan in singapore where it's 5:00 p.m. in the city. let's get a view of where the asian markets have closed today. a lot of hopes pengd on the european union. they might come up with a plan to bail out greece. the nikkei 225 is up marginally. toyota continues to be focused. that stock climbing despite anal announcement that it's recalling another set of cars. the shanghai market up more than 1%. a lot of positive comments out in the country about strong import data and export data and that's helping to lift sentiment in china. the kos pit is moving up flat. people and investors are staying on the sidelines. the bombay sensex is trading down 0.5% and the aussie market is pretty much flat, up 0.2%. the ftse cnbc global 300 up 8 points, 4,243. ross, good to see you. >> hey, christine. we're very much focused on the w
't paying attention. my lead of the bernanke speech was discount rate to be hiked. my lead on the minutes was -- >> it sounds like -- >> let me finish, melissa, just be clear, my sources are telling me in the wake of this that the concept there's another bit to come is not necessarily true. they may stop here. so the idea that somehow they're just beginning this process of going back to 100 over on the fed funds is not true. it's out there in a lot of stuff. they may stop here. >> rich bernstein -- >> i want to ask both of you. do you think fed funds december 31, 2010 will be higher than they are today? >> well, let me answer that question and put it back to you. the typical forecast, is that the unemployment rate will be 9.5% or higher. also, that the inflation rate over the last year will be 1 to 1.25%. i have to ask you if you think at that point the fed would begin to tighten? you tell me. >> first of all, i think the bond market will -- i don't think the bond market looks at core. i hate to argue with on you this one, but if we find the inflation rate starts breaking 3, 3.5, we break
bernanke and the possibility of raising interest rates. or effectively raising interest rates. that is today's street poll. not long ago, this man had limited mobility. last month, this woman wasn't even able to get around inside of her own home. they chose mobility. and they chose the scooter store! if you or a loved one live with limited mobility call the scooter store! no other company will work harder to make you mobile or do more to guarantee your complete satisfaction. if we pre-qualify you for a new power chair or scooter and your claim isn't approved, the scooter store will give you your power chair or scooter free. that's our guarantee. they were so helpful and nice. they filed all the paperwork, and medicare and my insurance covered the cost. we can work directly with medicare or with your insurance company. we can even help with financing. if there's a way, we'll find it! so don't wait any longer, call the scooter store today. >>> as america slowly recovers from the recession many investors have been looking to china, the country's economy is in the middle of a huge
. appreciate getting my time. thank you, chairman bernanke, for being here. i do share one concern that senator vitter mentioned about the deficit. gosh, i wish we would have supported senator gregg's proposal when we had a chance, i think it was still the best, perhaps last-best proposal to actually force this congress to take an up or down vote on a plan that would put us back into fiscal sanity. i'm going to come back on the question of financial regulation. .. >> one of the comments you made and we are now 18 months after the crisis and you've said you have looked at the fed within supervision of the bank holding companies stronger capital, stronger risk supervision. you know, we've had a lot of discussion over the last 18 months about size. we've talked a bit earlier, senator raise questions about the volcker rule. i share some of your concerns about how you draw those lines. chairman dodd raise the question about using some of the intimate out there in terms of derivatives. can you tell us a little bit in his last 18 months with this increased focus on the largest sophisticated bank holdi
. and i said this to tim geithner, the treasury secretary. that means henry paulson, ben bernanke, were the dentists. how does that make you feel, the thing that everybody hates is the thing you had to do. >> let me tell you, i felt like i was having a root canal. >> without anesthesia. >> i was a dentist having a root canal without anesthesia at the same time. but there's a scene in the book -- my book, "on the brink," and this was a day or two before we were going to need to step in and rescue citigroup. and what really hit me was that i was forever going to be associated with these bailouts and it would be the treasury secretary that did all these interventions. then, i said, that would be the good news. the bad news will be if we can't cobble together something that works for citigroup and it goes down. bi i'll be the treasury secretary who presides over another great depression. >> back with david gergen and diane brady. the reason we have you guys on is because you're honest about this. i think -- i think henry paulson had it right on there and there's a whole lot of revisionist h
commercial real estate? i guess that you were all looking and listening to chairman bernanke when he talked about the next wave of defaults in the real estate area. >> yes. chair come well last questions, thank you very much -- develop last request questions. new loan fund than they did under the t.a.r.p. capital programs. one very important difference is that tarp was intended to provide capital for banks to assure their viability under conditions. this is powerful program designed to get banks to lend because as you know the dividend rate on this new capital can drop dramatically if and only if banks lend beyond where they are lending today. couple other points. the small banks we're talking about, have done a pretty good job of maintaining lending balances during this very difficult recession. we think many of them are eager to lend, and by providing them with more capital, in this case capital that could increase their tier 1 capital by 30 to 50% they should be more confident about able to support existing assets and increase their lending at the same time. >> it just brings me back mem
efforts by raising interest rates. chairman ben bernanke outlined the effort in written testimony for a congressional committee. bernanke said the economy still needs an easy money policy for now, but he added: "at some point the federal reserve will need to tighten financial conditions." the talk of higher rates kept wall street at bay. the dow jones industrial average lost 20 points to close at 10,038. the nasdaq fell three points to close below 2,148. thousands of workers in greece staged a national strike today, protesting a government plan to freeze salaries and cut bonuses. the 24-hour strike closed schools, and brought air travel to a halt. we have a report from john sparks of independent television news. >> reporter: it's easy to say, the 24-hour strike closed greece filed a test case for other indebted states. its huge socialist government plans been cuts. for many here on the streets of athens today it is not acceptable. "the capitalist government has declared war on the working classes. we will respond with war-like measures," said this mp. the government wants to raise
'll see what fed chairman ben bernanke has to say on tuesday and wednesday. he may shed a little more light on what the fed's policy actions yesterday and what they may be in the coming weeks and months. >> alex, what do you expect next week from bernanke and what do you think the reaction will be? >> it's two different things. i expect him to do nothing. what i would hope he does is raise rates. in the energy market you have a complete disconnect between fundamentals and price. if you look at the amount of crude, heat and gasoline in storage, we're at absurdly high levels but the price is also ridiculous and it's ridiculous because the dollar is so weak. so unless he does something and does what he should do you'll have crude continue to just drag itself higher with a weakening dollar and that's an unfortunate thing because it really doesn't help anybody. >> where do you think, alex, prices are going to be at memorial day on oil? >> i think what's going to happen is that i'm tending to fight this. i think that they want to push it towards $80 but i think it runs out of gas around the
me, i'm chaled. >> and what are you expecting to hear from bernanke on capitol hill tomorrow? you say restraint is needed. why and when? >> well, you know, the reason i think that restraint is needed is because i think that he may be getting a little bit behind the curve. the reason i say that is a lot of the so-called leading indicators of inflation, my work, suggested inflation in 2010 is going to be higher than the consensus expectation. so the consensus expects inflation to be around 2%. i think it could be over 3% in 2010. and i think bernanke needs to start move towards restraint, in other words, start to move towards some of the excess liquidity driving this inflation. so i think sooner as opposed to later. i actually think that if he starts to move towards restraint wibt might lead to an increase in bank lending, which is sorely acting. but nevertheless, i think he needs to move towards restraint sooner than the consensus believes, not later. >> that's what i wanted to ask you about. we're getting comments in from the fed's bill dudley who says small banks are fuelling the pre
an international from the goldman sachs was number one you need 100 calls to federal chair ben bernanke but then the next highest number of calls and that burger you need 103 -- to emineth named dan jester -- thank you, mr. chairman. may i ask what firm that he worked for -- >> he worked for goldman sachs. >> i will have additional questions with regard to you phoned and we will place that in the record. >> can i just say one thing in response to this? it's very important, congress and you were suggesting the people involved in this were not acting in the public interest and you were suggesting they were working for the private interest now the public interest and that is not true and i believe none of those individuals would be part of a decision like that and i think these people were people of enormous integrity and experience operating under exceptional circumstances with no precedent doing the best they could for what was in the public interest -- >> i must move, i must move. the gentleman from florida secretary geithner, win did aig if you could give the date when did aig call and
. >> do you think geithner in this administration and the previous administration, geithner and bernanke and larry summers have done a good job in hemming the financial sector as well as -- >> you know, 2020 hindsight is a specialty in this country and now we're having all kinds of hearings. but at the time this thing hit us in a significant way, those guys were working 18, 19 hours 0 day. they were making decisions with the information that they had available. they made mistakes. but the bottom line is, the system is still working. we are making progress. >> and we averted disaster. >> we averted two or three disasters. and i, therefore, applaud what they did, and if you notice, we support what they did. were there errors? sure. >> did i make judgments that weren't perfect? you bet. >> what does the chamber think about the boca rules. >> chairman volkert is a very smart man. and he raises a thoughtful argument. that press conference with the volkert rules and things the political guys threw in that was not naferred by geithner and sumners. but the volkert rules make since with one excep
velshi later today. >> a lot of great stuff. >> ben bernanke will testify on the hill today. >> we'll get his prescription or a forecast on what will happen with the overall economy. a lot of questions. when will this economy be back to normal and what is normal? that means your job, home and bank. let's take a look at where we stand. the national association of business economics predicts job growth is on its way, forecasting 140,000 jobs per month will be added in 2010. in the new normal, no thing is ever as it seems. yesterday we found out mass layoffs rose last month for the first time since august. more than 180,000 folks fell victim to mass layoffs in january. we saw consumer confidence tumble. consumers are still very nervous. how about your house? your biggest asset most likely or what was once your biggest asset. one out of every four mortgages is under water. it means you owe more than the house is worth. foreclosure will continue. speaking of lenders, banks still in trouble. one out of 11 banks is at risk of going under. that's the problem bank lift, 140 banks were shut down la
bernanke is concerned about the nation's economic recovery. during the ceremonial swearing in for his second term, bernanke told staffers that despite a growing economy, far too many people remain unemployed. he also talked about the challenges facing the fed, which include protecting its independence from congress and making the institution more open and accountable. >>> president obama's aunt is preparing to make her second bid for political asylum. she'll go before an immigration judge if boston after defying a deportation order in 2004. she's expected to argue that ties to the president could make her a political target if she returns to kenya. her status was revealed shortly before president obama was elected in 2008. >>> and while many of you are gearing up for this sunday's super bowl, some in the nfl are worried that the game's days could be numbered. the players association fears owners will impose a work stoppage after the current collective bargaining agreement expires and they're taking their caught to capitol hill. the league says a new collective bargaining agreement wil
her terribly. >> some of the stories this morning at 10:00 a.m., ben bernanke is on capitol hill. all ears will listen to his take on job creation. this afternoon, the president will make his case for creating more jobs. it's going to happen at the business round table. >>> this afternoon in vancouver, fresh off the upset of team canada, the u.s. men's hockey team takes on switzerland. >> usa! usa! >> something tells me you are watching. >>> a star sentenced to five years in prison for shooting his limmo driver. it's been years coming. >> eight years in the running. this is a guy who literally had it all at one point. an nba all-star. one of the richest contracts in the league. prosecutors say he was playing with a shotgun, shot his driver, tried to cover it up. yesterday, a new jersey judge sentenced him to five years in prison. afterwards, he said he was sorry. >> i sincerely apologize for my actions that caused his death. i pray that today brings you some comfort. my children, you deserve a better father. son, brothers than i have been. >> he was apologizing to his victims there. h
's an interesting idea. bernanke yesterday mentioned that the spike in jobless claims might have been at least partly related to the weather. i would say there's a little more uncertainty than maybe mr. knapp suggests as to whether or not this is weather related or how much of a comedown we're getting from that fourth quarter gdp which was very strong and as you said revised up, erin, to 5.9% from 5.7%. it is interesting to look at the details and where the strength was to kind of figure out whether or not, how much of that is going to continue. what you see when you look at it is the consumer was pretty weak at one point, 7%, and nobody thinks that's going to be any stronger in this quarter. business spending was very strong. that's a wild card. that could continue. exports strong again and of course the big part of that not shown here are the inventories -- inventory numbers. this conference, though, is going to be about the fed policy and the fed's role put on here by the university of chicago's school of business. there are going to be no less than four members of the federal market commit
for the u.s. in 2 1/2 years at around 0.5%. and looking at what bernanke said this week, gave us a laundry list of ways to exit the strategy, basically, and he basically talked about, you know, the possibility of increasing interests on bank reserves. and while in basically contrast, the ecb is not going to do the exit strategy. it's going to stay in and maybe in too deep right now as it may need to provide some liquidity out of what happened from greece. so that will definitely give the yield luster for the u.s. dollar. >> so what target would you put on euro/dollar? >> still looking at 1.32% before the end of the quarter. any bounce, really, is going to be more of the corrective bounce, not more than 1.3950. >> i was wondering, what do you see the likelihood of a new and increased quantitative easing effort by the ecb, either in a direct like we've seen in the u.s. or uk and a continuation of the currency? >> look, even though they said they are not going to provide renewed 12-month loan facility, the ecb, this institution that has been seen as one of the first institutions to get out of
week leading a charge to convince ben bernanke and geithner to use their power to increase liquidity for the commercial marketplace. good or bad idea? >> right. well, i don't want to see the government actually spending money. one of the problems we have in commercial real estate, in fact in small business lending is the regulators, government is leaning on small banks so hard they are scared to lend now. and it's an overreaction. we get overlenient on regulations sometimes and then overregulatory and i think we're having too much regulation today. gregg: your bottom line is government, butt out. brian wesbury, thanks for being with us. >> thanks, great to be with you. martha: surveillance camera images that are truly horrifying. a 15-year-old girl, hard to watch, folks -- savagely beaten, while security guard, the guys in the vests, standing around while the girl is kicked in the head. what are these people's excuses for what they did? and what is this city doing now to stop this? >> plus it looks more like the northeast than the south. can you believe this? a wicked winter storm is
bush, ben bernanke, tim geithner to get the record out. this is news in and of itself, michelle, beyond the details you point out. his first-person account goes into the record and it's going to be essential to figure out where did we go wrong and how do we fix it? amazing to me the number of things that aren't fixed yet. >> final thought to you? >> i agree with steve. it was remarkable book. it helps the history exicle record. i call it pg version. he said the british screwed us. in my book he uses a colorful phrase. >> andrew, thank you. steve, thank you. the word on the street goldman sachs' ceo lloyd blankfein could collect a bonus up to $100 million according to the report in the times of london. goldman sachs roundly distribpu the rumor saying there's speculation and there's stupidity. this speculation transcends the stupid and takes it to a new level. i would call that -- that would be your denial-denial. >> that would be a strong denial. goldman sachs shares gaining 90% for a year and about 4% higher right now. the goldman sachs folks knocked this story down. it is only in the t
together with bernanke's exit speech, you put that together and people say, wait a second, maybe the tight is turning. and being on top of the timing of when the fed starts to tighten or when the rhetoric changes, because when the rhetoric changes, that's when rates will change. and if there weren't enough international news, the european central bank plans to join forces of the european commission to monitor the situation in greece. ecb president jean-claude trichet says the two will draw up necessary measures to maintain stability in the euro zone. european officials offered support for debt-laden greece at a summit yesterday. we don't know what's in the plan. it's some sort of support. >> i don't know what the plan is. except everybody is happy they're in a plan. >> they're in something. they've expressed support. >> monday, the finance ministers meet again. this may be a situation where you see more of the details that start to emerge. what's it call, the european -- the meeting on monday. >> what worries me is that the plan itself will be so underwell manying that people will say, is
them like you hate a root canal. that means ben bernanke, you guys were the dentists. how does that make you feel the thing that everyone hates sts thing you had to do. >> i felt like i was having a root canal without anesthesia at the same time. there's a scene in my book "on the brink." and this was a day or two before we were going to need to step in and rescue citigroup. what really hit me was that i was forever going to be associated with these bailouts and the treasury secretary that did these interventions. then i said, that will be the good news. the bad news will be if we can't cobble together something that works for citigroup and it goes down, i'll be one who presides over another great depression. >> remember it was fanny and fred die and city citigroup and a whole host of other banks, ways to try to fix this without public intervention. he talks about the realization he was going to be forever knowns the guy behind the bailouts and how shocking it was. it came to him walking through the reagan library working through the citigroup stuff, the temple of free market t
, some news today. federal reserve chairman ben bernanke told the senate banking committee today and his second day of testimony on capitol hill this week that interest rates will have to stay low for a lengthy period to counter a weak job market. the u.s. central bank chief prepared remarks were virtually identical to those delivered yesterday to the house financial services committee. and cheaper nike also told lawmakers that goldman sachs and other wall street firms may be looking into a sophisticated instrument investment instrument to make bets that greece will default on its debts. also about the healthcare summit which you can see live on c-span3 and c-span.org, a story from yahoo news saying that a consensus on how to rein in spiraling healthcare costs seem to be emerging as president obama some that the president agreed with assertions by oklahoma republican senator tom coburn that abuse them out account up to a third of the cost of a time of programs like medicare and medicaid. and is a major barrier to worldwide insurance coverage. senator coburn said that the cost is the chie
of making decisions on interest rates. mr. bernanke does testify regularly on capitol hill explaining what he is doing, and why he is affecting monetary policy the way he is. some, like milton friedman, have suggested that we could replace federal reserve with a computer that could determine these interest-rate formulas. perhaps that would be better. federal reserve policy can be subject to certain criticism. i do not hoknow how we would do this. there is disagreement on the way they have handled the recession, and that is fair. host: another tweet -- guest: $3 trillion of the deficit? over the next 10 years, if we expended all the tax cuts, for everyone, that would be about $3 trillion. the deficit is much bigger than that. the base line is $11 trillion. if you got rid of all the tax cuts, we would still have and $8 trillion deficit over the next 10 years. president obama is not talking about doing that. only for those making more than $250,000 a year. that is only 1/5 of the tax cuts. if you want to get rid of "tax cuts for the rich" it is over $16 billion from a deficit of $11 trillion.
and secretary geithner concerning bans on proprietary trading by banks. according to chairman bernanke of the federal reserve, ben own proprietary trading for commercial banks may not be constructive. dr. summers, chief economic advisor in the current administration in the past has been a vocal proponent removing glass-steagall restraints. is there something in this obama administration and among the regulators concerning the volcker rule and restricting size and if so, what process -- what was expressed there? >> thank you, senator shelby. that's obviously a very important question. the proposals that the president articulated with respect to size and scope two weeks ago were ones that were based on a consensus recommendation of all of his economic team. so -- and i think you've heard secretary geithner and director summers speak to that quite directly. i think with respect to the regulators they are, of course, independent and i feel slightly less comfortable expressing their views. but i do think that in the main they are also supportive of this and we will work with them and obviou
market overseas are down in anticipation of fed chairman ben bernanke's testimony. that will happen in congress and will happen today. he's talking where the economy is going and what's going to happen to interest rates. it comes a day after the consumer confidence index dropped 10 points. i'm competent this segment will with gretchen. >> freedom of speech is live and well in america's universities, we know that, right? unless you're saying something that the students don't like. check out recently happened at u.c. irvine when the israeli ambassador to the u.s., michael orrin tried to deliver a speech he was invited to make. >> it's a source of frustration the person who spent much of his life speaking hebrew. >> not -- >> haven't come to this campus to hear one idea. you've come to hear a multiplicity of ideas. >> guilty of 100 -- >> you, sir are responsible for genocide. >> ok. fox news contributor tucker carlson is joining us this morning from washington. good morning to you, tucker. >> good morning. >> that's disgraceful. they invite this guy to the university to speak and c
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)